Workplace Bullying Complaint Investigations

Workplace Bullying Complaint Investigations a HR or WHS issues?

Having investigated 100s of workplace bullying complaint investigation and conducted many training sessions. I have found that the requests/engagements have always come from the HR department or another senior manager (if there is no dedicated HR) but never from a manager involved in safety or WHS.

Would a shift in responsibility for the handling of bullying and harassment complaints and training from HR to WHS/HSE affect the process and how bullying and harassment was viewed and dealt with in the workplace?

Should workplace bullying be teat like any other health hazard in the workplace?

An important consideration is how bullying/harassment complaints are addressed by external agencies. In my experience a complaint of bullying/harassment is often accompanied by a WorkCover or Worker’s compensation claim, this I think would tend to indicate that bullying and harassment complaint fall under the jurisdiction of WHS/HSE manager.

Contrary to this complaints that proceed to the Fair Work Commission in the form of anti-bullying orders seem to be the jurisdiction of the HR manager. Either way I think that it is important for employers or organisation to have trusted and effective training, policing and investigation processes in place. I would love to hear opinions from HR/HSE/WHS managers.

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/
http://awpti.com.au/training/

Workplace bullying building trust – a recent article in HRD reference a A recent study conducted by Bupa that found a not so surprising link between trust and employee retention, with 53% of employees citing it as a major factor in whether they left a role. Article here

A great way to promote or destroy trust can be found in the way employers respond to incidents of bullying, harassment and sexual harassment.  From an employees perspective seeing something done builds trust, watching as nothing is done destroys trust.

I have conducted a number of investigations where I have heard comment such as “there was no point reporting this in the past, nothing ever happens.” when I hear this I consider it to be a systematic failure on the part of the organisation and in such cases it is not uncommon for staff to leave.

Workplace bullying building trust – It is a problem for employers when they are losing good staff only to be left with the bullies.

Workplace bullying building trust – What can employers do to build trust?

  1. Have a policy in place that sets out the behavioural expectations of the organisation.
  2. Have a trusted reporting mechanism in place for workplace bullying, harassment, sexual harassment and other forms of misconduct. It is important to remember, the mechanism will only be result if the reporters see action.
  3. Have a timely process in place to fairly, professionally investigate complaints of workplace bullying, harassment, sexual harassment and other forms of misconduct.

It is important that;

  1. The process to be transparent, remember trust coming from seeing something done
  2. Parties involved are kept up to date with the progress of any investigation.
  3. The person assigned to investigate the complaint has the skill, experience and time to do so in a fair and unbiased manner. If that can’t be achieved consider using an external investigator.

AWPTI can assist you with complete investigation services, however if you wish to DIY we suggest that you purchase our comprehensive Workplace Investigation Toolbox that contains 40 documents and manuals

  1. Step by step workplace investigation instructions (20 documents) (pdf)
  2. Complaint Analysis Chart (pdf)
  3. Investigation Flow Chart (pdf)
  4. Investigation Interview Manual (pdf)
  5. Procedural Fairness Manual (pdf)
  6. Reasonable Management Action Manual (pdf)
  7. Sexual harassment Manual (pdf)
  8. Evidence Manual (pdf)
  9. Template Risk Assessment form (Word doc)
  10. Template investigation plans x 2 (Word doc)
  11. Template letter to the complainant (Word doc)
  12. Template letter to the witnesses (Word doc)
  13. Template initial letter to the respondent (Word doc)
  14. Template letter of allegation to the respondent (Word doc)
  15. Template complainant interview guide/script (Word doc)
  16. Template witness interview guide/script (Word doc)
  17. Template respondent interview guide/script (Word doc)
  18. Sample witness statement (Word doc)
  19. Sample interim report (Word doc)
  20. Sample final investigation report (Word doc)

The word Docs allow you to use the templates and customise them for your investigation. Click here for further details or to purchase for only $795.00

If you don’t wish to purchase the entire toolbox you can purchase the manuals separately – More details

You may be interested in these articles
Drafting allegations – http://awpti.com.au/workplace-investigations-drafting-allegations/
Drafting allegation letters – http://awpti.com.au/workplace-investigation-allegation-letters/
(The templates in the document toolbox can ensure that you get this right)

AWPTI Investigation services – More details

AWPTI can also provide you with Workplace Investigation training – More details

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/
http://awpti.com.au/training/

Workplace Investigation getting it right for first time every time – Recently an article appeared in the Brisbane times that alleged that a cadet journalist was dismissed unfairly, the headline reading – ‘This is disgusting’: Seven Network under fire after cadet dismissed”Link to article

Please note, this post is based on the information contained in the article no judgement is made on the validity of the content and to our knowledge the allegation made against Channel Seven have not been tested. Channel Seven has since denied the allegations and the matter was settled out of Court in February.

This article considers the general principals of procedural fairness. regardless of whether or not Channel Seven did the right things here are some tips about procedural fairness in dealing with misconduct matters.

Some of the issues raised in the article included;
“When Ms Taeuber asked for the statement of the person making the allegations of bullying against her, the HR manager said: “OK, so how do we want to plan your exit, Amy? I do understand that we don’t want to make it humiliating for you.”

This may fall under the FWA procedural fairness guideline – the right to know

The right to know is referenced in the Fair Work Act 2009 – s387 – Criteria for considering harshness etc.

In considering whether it is satisfied that a dismissal was harsh, unjust or unreasonable, the FWC must take into account;

s387 (b) whether the person was notified of the reason for the allegation of misconduct.

It is important that a person accused of wrongdoing or misconduct has the right to know what it is alleged that they have done. This should be done at the earliest possible opportunity in as much detail as is reasonable.

The right be heard or to respond to an allegation/complaint or performance issue is referenced in the Fair Work Act 2009 – s387 – criteria for considering harshness etc.

In considering whether it is satisfied that a dismissal was harsh, unjust or unreasonable, the FWC must take into account:

s387 (C)  whether the person was given an opportunity to respond to any reason related to the capacity or conduct of the person

When a complaint or allegation is made against an employee or that an employee’s behaviour or performance is unsatisfactory, that employee has the right to respond or put their side of the story or version of events forward.

In the case of a complaint or allegation, after the employee has been advised of the issue they must be given sufficient time to consider the complaint before being asked to respond. The time will depend on the seriousness and perhaps the number of issues. We recommend putting yourself in their place and provide sufficient time.

The article also stated that;

“The audio recording puts a spotlight on Seven’s treatment of its employees. Early in the meeting, the HR manager had ordered Ms Taeuber’s support person, chief of staff Lesley Johns, leave the room. When Ms Johns began to protest, she was cut off.”

This may fall under the FWA procedural fairness guideline – the right to have a support person present

The right to have a support present during interviews that may result in disciplinary action being taken against the employee is referenced in the Fair Work Act 2009 – s387 – Criteria for considering harshness etc.

In considering whether it is satisfied that a dismissal was harsh, unjust or unreasonable, the FWC must take into account:

s387 (d) any unreasonable refusal by the employer to allow the person to have a support person present to assist at any discussions relating to dismissal

Workplace Investigation getting it right for first time every time – The investigation into workplace misconduct and complaints requires experience and expertise in understanding of the process, investigative interviewing, procedural fairness, the rules of evidence and relevant legislation. If you don’t have this or the time to conduct a thorough investigation we recommend one of three options;

  1. Call an expert – http://awpti.com.au/ or contact us on 02 9674 4279 or enquiries@awpti.com.au
  2. Get some training, we highly recommend – http://awpti.com.au/investigation-training/
  3. If you still want to ‘Do it Yourself’ without training we have a number of products that can assist – http://awpti.com.au/hr-products/

Don’t take the risk of getting in wrong, it can be costly.

AWPTI – Workplace training Sydney and through-out NSW and national wide
Misconduct training, bullying training, harassment training & sexual harassment training, dispute & grievance resolution training, management training.

http://awpti.com.au/training/

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The author Phil O’Brien is a highly experienced and skilled workplace investigator and trainer who can take the stress out of conducting workplace investigations into bullying, harassment, sexual harassment, discrimination and other forms of misconduct.

This is general information only. It does not replace advice from a qualified workplace investigator in your state or territory.  It is recommended that should you encounter issues in the workplace that you seek advice from suitability qualified and experienced workplace investigators.

This is general information only. It does not replace advice from a qualified legal professional or workplace investigator in your state or territory.  It is recommended that should you encounter issues in the workplace that you seek advice from suitability qualified and experienced legal professional or workplace investigators.

Workplace Bullying is an issue that is still facing an increasing number of employers and adversely affecting many employees.

To address these issues we recommend the following;
1. Training on what workplace bullying is and what it is not and what the behavioural expectations of the organisation are. AWPTI can assist with a number of programs for mangers, staff and HR professionals – http://awpti.com.au/training/

2. Investigate complaints in a timely and professional manner – Not sure what to do or how to do it, Read more,
AWPTI can assist – http://awpti.com.au/investigations/

What is workplace bullying?

Workplace bullying is any behaviour that is repeated, systematic and directed towards an employee or group of employees that a reasonable person, having regard to the circumstances, would expect to victimise, humiliate, undermine or threaten and which creates a risk to health and safety.

The principles contained in the anti-bullying provisions of the Fair Work Act also provide assistance in determining whether bullying has occurred. The Fair Work Commission’s Anti-bullying Benchbook provides download here: FWC Anti Bullying Benchbook

Bullying – When is a worker bullied at work?

See Fair Work Act s.789FD – Read more

A worker is bullied at work if, while the worker is at work in a constitutionally-covered business, another individual, or group of individuals, repeatedly behaves unreasonably towards the worker, and that behaviour creates a risk to health and safety.

Bullying can cover behaviours carried out by one or more people.

The definition gives effect to the Government’s response to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Education and Employment’s report Workplace bullying We just want it to stop”.

Repeated unreasonable behaviour

The Committee noted that ‘repeated behaviour’ refers to the persistent nature of the behaviour and can refer to a range of behaviours over time and that ‘unreasonable behaviour’ is behaviour that a reasonable person, having regard to the circumstances, may see as unreasonable (in other words it is an objective test). This would include (but is not limited to) behaviour that is victimising, humiliating, intimidating or threatening.

There is no specific number of incidents required for the behaviour to be considered ‘repeated’, nor does the same specific kind of behaviour have to be repeated.

Risk to health and safety

A risk to health and safety means the possibility of danger to health and safety, and is not confined to actual danger to health and safety.

The ordinary meaning of ‘risk’ is exposure to the chance of injury or loss.

The bullying behaviour must create the risk to health and safety. Therefore there must be a causal link between the behaviour and the risk. Cases on causation in other contexts suggest that the behaviour does not have to be the only cause of the risk, provided that it was a substantial cause of the risk viewed in a common sense and practical way.

Behaviour will not be considered bullying if it is reasonable management action carried out in a reasonable manner.

Safe Work Australia – Guide for Preventing & Responding to Workplace Bullying

Safe Work Australia has provided guidelines for the prevention of and response to workplace bullying – download here – Safework Australia Guide to preventing & responding to workplace bullying

Workplace bullying can adversely affect the psychological and physical health of a person. Workplace bullying is a psychological hazard that has the potential to harm a person, and it also creates a psychological risk as there is a possibility that a person may be harmed if exposed to it. If effective control measures are put in place to address and resolve workplace issues early, a workplace can minimise the risk of workplace bullying and prevent it from becoming acceptable behaviour in the workplace.

Workplace bullying is repeated and unreasonable behaviour directed towards a worker or a group of workers that creates a risk to health and safety.

Repeated behaviour refers to the persistent nature of the behaviour and can involve a range of behaviours over time.

Unreasonable behaviour means behaviour that a reasonable person, having considered the circumstances, would see as unreasonable, including behaviour that is victimising, humiliating, intimidating or threatening.

Examples of behaviour, whether intentional or unintentional, that may be workplace bullying if they are repeated, unreasonable and create a risk to health and safety include but are not limited to:

  • abusive, insulting or offensive language or comments
  • aggressive and intimidating conduct
  • belittling or humiliating comments
  • victimisation
  • practical jokes or initiation
  • unjustified criticism or complaints
  • deliberately excluding someone from work-related activities
  • withholding information that is vital for effective work performance
  • setting unreasonable timelines or constantly changing deadlines
  • setting tasks that are unreasonably below or beyond a person’s skill level
  • denying access to information, supervision, consultation or resources to the detriment of the worker
  • spreading misinformation or malicious rumours, and
  • changing work arrangements such as rosters and leave to deliberately inconvenience a particular worker or workers.

If the behaviour involves violence, for example physical assault or the threat of physical assault, it should be reported to the police.

Workplace bullying can also be subtle & could include behaviour such as:

  • Deliberately excluding, isolating or marginalising a person from normal workplace activities
  • Intruding on a person’s space by pestering, spying or tampering with their personal effects or work equipment
  • Intimidating a person through inappropriate personal comments, belittling opinions or unjustified criticism

Covert behaviour that undermines, treats less favourably or dis-empowers others is also bullying; for example:

  • Overloading a person with work
  • Setting timelines that are very difficult to achieve or constantly changing deadlines
  • Setting tasks that are unreasonably beyond a person’s ability
  • Ignoring or isolating a person
  • Deliberately denying access to information, consultation or resources
  • Unfair treatment in relation to accessing workplace entitlements, such as leave or training or failure to provide adequate training

Workplace bullying can take place in person, through a secondary person or other persons or via remote communications such as telephone, email or the internet.

The use of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or online chat forums for bullying purposes in or outside the workplace can constitute workplace bullying if it forms part of a pattern, or is an extension of bullying that has or is occurring in the workplace or is directed at a fellow employee.

Workplace bullying behaviour does not include:

  • Reasonable action taken, in a reasonable manner by an employer to counsel, transfer, demote, discipline, retrench or dismiss an employee
  • Legitimate and appropriate management including the management of performance
  • Legitimate and appropriate performance review
  • A decision by an employer, based on reasonable grounds, not to award or provide a promotion, transfer, or benefit about an employee’s employment
  • Reasonable administrative action taken in a reasonable manner by an employer about an employee’s employment; or
  • Reasonable action taken in a reasonable manner under an Act affecting an employee
  • Management of work-related interpersonal conflicts and occasional differences of opinion which may be more appropriately addressed under the companies Grievance Resolution policy
  • Investigations into bona fide complaints
  • Participation in dispute resolution processes

For assistance with training (we have specialised packages for managers, staff and HR professionals) or investigation please contact us – enquiries@awpti.com.au or 02 9674 4279

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

 

Workplace bullying workplace harassment – Why has this research been done?

  • To better understand the prevalence of workplace bullying and harassment in Australian workplaces and to identify workplace risk factors associated with the occurrence of bullying and harassment.

What did we find?

  • Bullying was measured using both a widely accepted international definition and the Australian definition used by Safe Work Australia. The prevalence rates using the international and the Australian definitions were similar: 9.7 per cent and 9.4 per cent of Australian workers respectively reported they had been bullied in the last six months.
  • Of the seven types of harassment measured, the most common form of harassment experienced by Australian workers was reported as being sworn at or yelled at (37 per cent), followed by being humiliated in front of others (24 per cent).

What do the findings suggest?

  • Self-reported bullying is common in Australian workplaces and is associated with poor psychological health. Psychosocial Safety Climate (PSC) and psychosocial factors such as job demands, job control and job resources are also related to the occurrence of bullying and harassment.

You can download a copy of the report into Workplace bullying workplace harassment in pdf format – bullying-and-harassment-in-australian-workplaces-australian-workplace-barometer-results

Workplace bullying workplace harassment – Originally published at https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/doc/bullying-and-harassment-australian-workplaces-results-australian-workplace-barometer-201415

A word doc version of the report can be downloaded from the link above.

An understanding Workplace bullying workplace harassment is vitally important for all organisations, failure to take action to prevent or respond can be costly and could constitute a breach of your duty of care. Australian Workplace Training & Investigation can assist with training and investigation of Workplace bullying workplace harassment issues. Please contact us or 029674 4279 or enquiries@awpti.com.au

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/
http://awpti.com.au/training/

Workplace Investigation Procedural Fairness

Workplace Investigation Procedural Fairness – Decisions at the Fair Work Commission where a lack of procedural fairness has proved is costly once again

Two cases before the Fair Work Commission once again highlight that organisations are still having dismissal found as unfair due to a failure to afford an employee procedural fairness

In Schneider v Eliana Construction and Developing Group P/L [2016] FWC 5748  23 August 2016, the applicant Mr Schneider was employed as finance manager; he was dismissed for unsatisfactory conduct. The respondent claimed actions of applicant in submitting BASS statements without Director’s approval caused significant harm to company.

The Commission found that there was no valid reason for dismissal, that the applicant was not put on notice that employment at risk concerning either conduct or performance, he received no written or verbal warnings made and that there was an absence of procedural fairness. It was held that the dismissal unfair and compensation of $16,816 was ordered.

In Moore v Specialist Diagnostic Services P/L t/a Dorevitch Pathology [2016] FWC 5910 23 August 2016, the applicant Ms Moore was employed from July 2003 until April 2016 as pathology collector and promoted to collections co-ordinator. According to a termination letter she was dismissed for failing to follow reasonable directions

The commission found that the applicant not given clear and unambiguous opportunity to respond to reasons for dismissal and that the respondent’s decision maker not given all information to make decision.

In finding that there was no valid reason for dismissal, that the dismissal harsh, unjust and unreasonable and that the applicant was unfairly dismissed the Commission found there was lack of procedural fairness and uncertainty regarding respondent’s reasons for dismissal compensation of $27,900 was ordered.

The lesson for employers

If termination is being contemplated as an option, employers should consider an investigation to establish the full facts of the matter and provide the employee with the opportunity to respond in a timely manner.

The author Phil O’Brien is a highly experienced and skilled workplace investigator and trainer who can take the stress out of conducting workplace investigations into bullying, harassment, sexual harassment, discrimination and other forms of misconduct.

You can contact me on 02 9674 4279 or phil@awpti.com.au

This is general information only. It does not replace advice from a qualified workplace investigator in your state or territory.  It is recommended that should you encounter complaints in the workplace that you seek advice from suitability qualified and experienced workplace investigators.

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/

 

Investigating bullying

Investigating bullying – Why you should conduct a thorough and systematic investigation

An example of where a lack of investigation case was costly

 Investigating complaints made by employees in a thorough, professional and timely manner is a part of an employer’s duty of care and when considering the termination of an employee may form an important part of the process.

The case of Harley v Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Ltd [2010] FWA 62 illustrates an example of an unfair dismissal and the consequences of a lack of a proper investigation

The applicant Mr Harley was employed as a Business Development Executive at Aristocrat Technologies Pty Ltd (Aristocrat).

He had resigned after receiving a show cause letter from Aristocrat who claimed that he was under performing on sales targets and that there had been complaints about him from customers.

The applicant brought an unfair dismissal claim, claiming that he had been forced to resign as a result of a course of bullying and harassment engaged in by Aristocrat’s State Manager.

Commissioner Deegan agreed that the applicant had been constructively dismissed and that the dismissal was unfair.

He found that he had performed as well, or better, than most of the other business development executives during a difficult financial period and that he had been treated badly by the State Manager.

Significantly, he was highly critical of Aristocrat for failing to respond to the applicant’s harassment claims made against the State manager prior to his dismissal. He found that the human resources manager was “either uninterested in investigating the complaints properly or had no idea how to conduct such an investigation”.

The applicant was awarded 6 months’ salary in lieu of reinstatement.

This case is a strong reminder to HR professionals and managers to deal with employee complaints seriously and to conduct thorough investigations into complaints.

Link to case here http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/cases/cth/FWA/2010/62.html

The author Phil O’Brien is a highly experienced and skilled workplace investigator and trainer who can take the stress out of conducting workplace investigations into bullying, harassment, sexual harassment, discrimination and other forms of misconduct.

You can contact me on 02 9674 4279 or phil@awpti.com.au

This is general information only. It does not replace advice from a qualified workplace investigator in your state or territory.  It is recommended that should you encounter complaints in the workplace that you seek advice from suitability qualified and experienced workplace investigators.

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/

Workplace Bullying Myth Busting

Workplace Bullying Myth Busting – Instances of bullying in the workplace are an issue for many employers at some point especially if not managed correctly it can be very costly.  However a lot of the advice and suggestions for dealing with bullying while well-meaning simply do not work.

Let’s have a look at some of the common myths

Myth: You can eliminate bullying in the workplace.

Fact: Bullying is a human behaviour from the playground to the workplace bullies exist.  Is it unrealistic to believe bullying in a workplace can be completely eliminated but there are things you can do, some are effective, some are not.

What employers must ensure that they do is take ‘reasonable steps’ to stop or prevent bullying.

Myth: Having well written policies will stop workplace bullying.

Fact: Bullies ignore bullying policies, if they didn’t, they wouldn’t be a bully.

The well written policy helps to protect the employer should an alleged bullied employee make a negligence claim with regard to a breach of duty to maintain a safe workplace.

A well written policy is part of the ‘taking all reasonable steps’ defence and one of the first questions asked in a court of commission is “can you produce your bullying or workplace behaviour policy”

Not having a policy is a huge mistake, but a policy is not the be all and end all of an employer’s responsibility.

Myth: Conducting regular reviews on any anti-bullying related policies will help.

Fact: See above and again useful when arguing the ‘taking all reasonable steps’defence.

Myth: Communicate anti-bullying policies to all employees to emphasise that compliance is required.

Fact: That works well for those who are not bullies but again is ignored by the bullies.

Of course it does add to the ‘taking all reasonable steps’ defence when an employer is asked, “what have you done?”

Myth: Providing information and training to all employees about bullying will reduce bullying

Fact: That’s bit like saying publicising speed limits will reduce speeding when we all know that a speed camera or marked Highway Patrol car reduces speeding.

While this information and training may be ignored by the bullies it is a good opportunity to clearly define bullying and what is unacceptable conduct.

This works best if you are very clear about the repercussions for those who bully.

Make sure that there is accountability of attendance in the case of face to face training (my preferred method) or completion if it is online.

If a complaint is made having evidence that the bully attended training is very useful when it comes to taking disciplinary action and of course it also add to the ‘taking all reasonable steps’ defence.

So far most of the suggestions that I have seen may help to cover the employer but actually have little effect of the prevalence of bullying in the workplace.

 Myth:  Having a policy that states something like “in the first instance speak to the person bullying you and tell them how they are making you feel”.

Fact: Really, come on, not going to happen.

What you need is;

  • A trusted HR department or person that employees being bullied can come to and discuss the situation, seek help and get it
  • A trusted mechanism through which employees are able to make a complaint and know that action will be taken
  • An effective method of dealing with and investigating complaints
  • Trained HR professionals who can undertake a timely and efficient investigation or
  • A professional workplace investigator on speed dial (My number is below)

Myth:  The bully’s often aggressive persona and attitude makes them hard to deal with when trying to investigate complaints.

 Fact: Workplace bullies like the feeling of power and will often try to ‘Lord it over’and intimidate HR professionals.

In many cases I have been told by HR managers who have engaged me to conduct investigations that the perpetrator will be aggressive and difficult to deal with.  It’s funny how when I interview them in a formal manner they are often the opposite, often nervous, compliant and timid when they are out of their comfort zone and not able to flex their bullying muscles.

When bullies know that an employer is going to deal with them in a professional and formal manner the word gets out that bullying will not be tolerated and bullies will be dealt with.

Many workplace investigators are former police officers and are used to dealing with difficult people and they are not easily intimidated.

We refer to workplace investigations as the dark side of HR, as a manager or HR professional if you don’t want to walk on the dark side, call in an expert and save yourself the stress and know that we get it right the first time.

Workplace bullying myth busting

The author Phil O’Brien is a highly experienced and skilled workplace investigator and trainer who can take the stress out of conducting workplace investigations into bullying, harassment, sexual harassment, discrimination and other forms of misconduct.

You can contact me on 02 9674 4279 or phil@awpti.com.au

This is general information only. It does not replace advice from a qualified workplace investigator in your state or territory.  It is recommended that should you encounter complaints in the workplace that you seek advice from suitability qualified and experienced workplace investigators.

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/

Workplace Investigator – Why you should have a trusted one on speed dial.

Workplace Investigator – Having a relationship with a workplace investigator that can provide your organisation with benefits when it comes to;

Priority

Complaints, grievances and allegations of misconduct are stressful for everyone, the parties involved and the organisation.  You need to have these matters investigated in a timely and professional manner.  In addition to the disruption to the workplace, courts and tribunal have criticised organisations for workplace investigations that were not carried out in a timely manner.

Having a relationship with a qualified and experienced Workplace Investigator will generally see you being given priority.  Recently I conducted interviews with 1 day of receiving instructions and interviewed some of the parties on a Saturday morning.

Quality

Most organisations don’t have to deal with complaints, grievances and allegations of misconduct on an everyday basis, so in most cases when they engage an external investigator they really don’t know what they are getting.

When issues arise organisations usually have two choices when they decide to outsource;
(1) Go to Google – If you choose a workplace investigator or investigation company from the front page of Google, does that mean you are picking a good investigator or just one that has spent money on SEO or Ad Words?

(2) Engage someone you know, someone you trust, someone you have at least met and discussed your needs with, someone whose background, experience and qualifications you have reviewed.

In relation to Google, Australian Workplace Training & Investigation (AWPTI) ranks highly on Google in a number of investigation and training categories, I haven’t spend a cent of SEO, however I do publish a lot of interesting and I think helpful material via my website blog page http://awpti.com.au/blog/ and via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/philobrien1/ (if we are not connect, please feel free to send me a request).

I am always open to meeting with organisations to discuss how I can assist them with a view to developing an on-going relationship.

Cost

While I cannot speak for others, I provide special rates for my on-going clients.  It’s worth noting that I have observed, the bigger the investigation company, the more they charge and cost is not actually an indication of quality.

Advise to businesses

If you don’t have a relationship with a qualified and experienced workplace investigator take the time to meet with and get to know one, it could save you a lot of time, stress and money in the long run.

Please feel free to download my professional profile – Professional Profile Phi O’Brien

AWPTI – workplace investigation Sydney and through-out NSW, QLD and Victoria. Workplace training national wide
Misconduct investigations, bullying investigations, harassment investigations & sexual harassment investigations, complaint investigations, grievance investigations, discrimination investigations

www.awpti.com.au
http://awpti.com.au/investigations/